Can i Dye My Hair While Pregnant Second Trimester

Can i Dye My Hair While Pregnant Second Trimester

Hi Mommy, Welcome to PregnancyMommy. This time we will discuss about Can i Dye My Hair While Pregnant Second Trimester, hopefully the article we wrote can be useful for Mommy.

For many, an important part of your beauty regimen, going to the salon to get your hair colored, is probably something you've been doing for years. But once you find out you are pregnant, any activity that once seemed routine can be questioned.

Good news: Getting your hair colored during pregnancy is considered safe, especially in the second and third trimesters. Since most hair dyes make little contact with your scalp, there is little chance that chemicals will get into your bloodstream and, with it, your baby.

Read on to learn more about why it is generally considered safe to get your hair colored while you are pregnant.
 

What is hair dye?

Hair dyes come in different forms: permanent, semi-permanent and temporary. Permanent hair color is the most complex process and will last for months with little to no fading. The semi-permanent paint lasts a few weeks and can also be used at home to freshen up gray tones between salon visits. Temporary hair color is usually found in a spray formula and will fade after a wash or two.

There are also several different ways to apply hair dye. In a root repair, the dye is applied to your hair roots to match your hair color. This is usually a technique used to cover gray hair. A single process is when a color is applied all over the place to lighten or darken the hair.

Highlights, lowlights and balayage are when individual strands are "painted" to create dimension and contrast.

Tips for coloring hair while pregnant

Here are five tips to ensure you get the hair color you want while protecting your future baby.

    Wait until the second trimester. Is It Safe To Use Hair Dye While Pregnant? Research on this topic is limited, but many experts advise expectant mothers to wait until around the beginning of the second trimester. No doubt, after a month or so, you can be ready to fill the bottle (i.e. with hair dye) - with all of those pregnancy hormones racing through your body, your hair may be growing faster than ever and may even be a different texture and color than ever You are used to it. But the first 12 weeks are a time of great development for your baby: organs take shape, muscles and vocal cords form, and nail beds and hair follicles begin to develop. Even if you don't get much of the chemicals in hair dye - and there's actually no hard evidence that these chemicals actually harm your baby - why take the risk?

Choose the most secure services. As soon as you have received the green light from your doctor to book the salon appointment, you should reconsider which service you are using. Root repairs and a change in color from root to tip are considered a single process color; This means that the paint is applied to the hair and scalp, where the pores in your skin soak up the chemicals that can get into your bloodstream. For a safer alternative, try techniques that paint directly on the hair shaft - for example, highlights, lowlights, frosting, and strands. Pulling hair through a cap and then applying paint is a less common method, but just as safe as the cap covers the scalp.

Use soft color. The type of coloring you use is also important. Ask your barber about gentler options, such as paint with an ammonia-free base. If you're more of the DIY type, consider a semi-permanent paint - it doesn't contain ammonia and usually doesn't contain peroxide (bleach). Plus, it's more forgiving than permanent dyes and will gradually fade after about a month. Plant and henna paints are other less toxic alternatives to use in the home, but check the label before buying. Some so-called “natural” processes contain as many chemicals as their traditional counterparts.

Store ventilated and covered. When it is time to start coloring, experts agree that you should take some extra safety precautions. If you are in a salon, ask to be seated in a well-ventilated area. When you are at home, open the windows so you can breathe fresh air and not toxic fumes. Always wear gloves when applying the product to your own hair and slipping them on.

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